Google translations (NOT 100% accurate).

Calories Burned by Activities

Calories Burned - Swimmers

The Olympic triathlon swim is usually done in open water and takes an average of 37 minutes to complete. Depending on your prowess in the water, though, it could take anywhere from 23 to 48 minutes total. Vigorously swimming freestyle, the most common triathlon stroke, burns roughly 10 to 15 calories per minute. The average Olympic triathlon swim lasting 37 minutes would thus burn between 370 and 555 calories. Colder and rougher waters might increase this caloric burn due to the increased energy required to work through such challenging conditions.

Calories Burned - Cyclists

A 25-mile ride takes, on average, 1 hour and 22 minutes to complete during an Olympic triathlon. At this average pace of about 18 miles per hour, an athlete burns between 12 and 18 calories per minute, or 982 to 1,476 calories for the entire bike portion. Age group champs often complete this portion of the race in as little as 1 hour and 10 minutes, meaning they exceed 21 miles per hour and burn between 15 and 24 calories per minute as they ride.

Calories Burned - Runners

A 10K, or 6.2-mile run, takes the average triathlete about 1 hour to complete. Running at this pace burns between 10 and 15 calories per minute -- or 610 to 915 calories total. Running at a faster pace burns more calories per minute, but it also means you spend less time out on the course. The best athletes run at a seven- to eight-minute mile pace, and burn far greater calories per minute, but spend an average of 13 fewer minutes out on the course.

Exercises that stop fat burning!

a) Isolated Exercises.

Doing isolated exercises like bicep curls and tricep kick-backs will NOT get you any significant results. These one-muscle-at-a-time moves simply don't stimulate enough muscle fibers to build lean muscle or expend enough energy to maximize your calorie burn. If you want to build lean muscle while burning fat so you can get serious definition, you need to perform exercises that stimulate as many muscles and expend as much energy as possible at the same time.

b) Working Out With Machines.

Fancy machines may make the gym look high-end, but truthfully, about the only thing they're good for is for sitting down while you tie your shoes or catch your breath! The problem is that machines alter the way your body naturally moves and restrict your range of motion. This severely limits your ability to fully activate all of your muscles fibers (that means less fat burning and less muscle definition). Worse yet, machines can cause excessive strain on your joints, leading to nagging injuries down the road. If you want fast results, it's critical that you incorporate exercises that allow your body to move naturally with full range of motion so you can skyrocket your metabolism and tone your entire physique.

c) Doing Long Periods of Cardio.

You need to do cardio if you want to lose weight and burn fat...BUT there's a right way and a wrong way to do your cardio workouts. If you've been pounding the pavement or the treadmill with nothing to show for it (except sore joints and a pair of stinky worn out sneakers), you already know it takes a lot of effort to get minimal results.

d) Doing Crunches & Sit-Ups To Get Strong Abs.

If you want strong abs, doing traditional ab exercises like crunches and sit-ups will not get you a "six pack". In fact, doing any exercises that target your abs won't get you a six pack either! These so-called "ab" exercises are a complete waste of time. They don't make your abs get any more defined and they definitely don't burn any fat.

e) Repeating The Same Workouts Over & Over.

Repeating the same workouts over and over is a surefire way to stop getting you results. When it comes to your workouts, if you want to keep making progress and keep seeing changes in your body, you've got to start switching things up. Your body has an amazingly ability to adapt quickly and when it does, that's when you hit the dreaded level and you stop making progress.

f) Doing Long Workouts.

Longer workouts do not equal better or faster results. If you've been slaving away at the gym and your body isn't visibly changing, you can't do more of the same thing and expect a different result.

The amount of calories burned during one hour was based on a specific activity's metabolic equivalent of task (MET). Using an activity's MET, the amount of calories burned can be calculated by multiplying a person's weight in kilograms (weight in lbs/2.2) by MET. For example, the MET for playing golf while carrying a bag is 4.0. A person who weighs 125 lbs can convert their weight to kg by dividing 125 lbs by 2.2, which equals 56.8 kg. They would then multiply 56.8 kg by golf's MET of 4.0 to determine that they burn 227 calories an hour while carrying clubs (56.8 kg x 4.0 MET = 227 calories/hour).


Count how many calories you burn doing your favorite activities or how long you should do an activity to lose weight. How many calories did you burn today?. Simply enter your weight and the duration you generally spend being active (use decimals if you need to).

Don't forget to enter your weight!

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Result for Total calorie burned

0.0

Swim 0.0

  • Water Jogging 0.0
  • Water Aerobics 0.0
  • Swimming - 40-50% HR 0.0
  • Swimming - 50-60% HR 0.0
  • Swimming - 60-70% HR 0.0
  • Swimming - 80-90% HR 0.0
  • Swimming - 90-100% HR 0.0

Bicycle 0.0

  • Cycling Outdoor <10 mph 0.0
  • Cycling Outdoor 10-13 mph 0.0
  • Cycling Outdoor 13-16 mph 0.0
  • Cycling Outdoor 16-19 mph 0.0
  • Cycling Outdoor 19-22 mph 0.0
  • Cycling Outdoor 22-25 mph 0.0
  • Stationary Cycling - Slow 0.0
  • Stationary Cycling - Moderate 0.0
  • Stationary Cycling - Medium 0.0
  • Stationary Cycling - Fast 0.0
  • Stationary Cycling - Strong 0.0

Walk/Jog/Run 0.0

  • Walking 2.5 mph 0.0
  • Walking 3.5 mph 0.0
  • Jogging 4.5 mph 0.0
  • Running 5 mph (12 min/mi) 0.0
  • Running 5.2 mph (11.5 min/mi) 0.0
  • Running 6 mph (10 min/mi) 0.0
  • Running 6.7 mph (9 min/mi) 0.0
  • Running 7 mph (8.5 min/mi) 0.0
  • Running 7.5 mph (8 min/mi) 0.0
  • Running 8 mph (7.5 min/mi) 0.0
  • Running 8.6 mph (7 min/mi) 0.0
  • Running 9 mph (6.5 min/mi) 0.0
  • Running 10 mph (6 min/mi) 0.0
  • Running 10.9 mph (5.5 min/mi) 0.0

There can be no debate over whether or not physical activity is good for you; it burns calories, increases the metabolism, strengthens muscles, joints and bones, and can have a positive effect on your general mood. But there is debate over which exercises are best for you in terms of how many calories they burn.

Triathletes are huge fans of running. It allows you to get a stress-reducing, endurance-boosting workout with just a pair of shoes and an open road. It also burns calories, of course. At a 10-minute-per-mile pace—roughly the average guy’s marathon pace—you’ll fry about 10 calories a minute. That’s a solid number, and if you run faster, you can burn even more. But if running isn’t your favorite cardio activity, there are plenty of other modes of exercise that can help you torch calories at a lightning fast rate. You don’t need to pound the pavement to incinerate fat.


Here are 5 cardio exercises that burn more calories than running:

Kettlebell Swing

This is a simple exercise, but extremely effective using the whole body. Standing with your feet slightly more than shoulder width apart, hold a kettlebell with knees bent. Grip the kettlebell with both hands and lift to groin height. Ensure that your back is arched and that your head is upright. Keep the weight on your heels, bending at the knees, back straight and head looking up and forwards (as if you are going to sit down in a chair). Swing the kettlebell to the rear backwards, between the legs. The weight should remain on your heels and the shins should be vertical.

Indoor Rowing

Don't let the paddles (or pulleys) fool you -- this workout is all about your legs. In fact, a 45-minute class is about the equivalent of doing 1,200 squats and burns 850 calories.

Burpees

We stand in a comfortable upright position with our feet placed below our shoulders. We squat down, place our hands on the floor and jump backwards. We move our body to the floor to reach the push-ups home position. Now we push our body back upwards and jump forwards. We stand up and jump straight upwards while our hands touch the back of our head.

Jumping Rope

Make sure your rope is the right length. If you’re not sure how long your rope should be, take a look at my post on determining rope length. Stand up straight. Engage your abs and tuck your butt IN! Arms should be bent about 45 degrees with your elbows in close to your sides and hands pointed outward at about 2-3 and 10-11 o’clock. Try to keep your arms relaxed and a loose but firm (not stressed) grip on the handles.

Jump Squats

Place your feet shoulder-width apart. Bend at the knees while driving your hips back. Keep your chest up and your core tight. Remain in a squat stance as you forcefully push off the ground, jumping to the right side. Check your form then repeat, jumping to the other side. Keep alternating between sides.


Suggested Reading Material

This tool does not provide medical advice. You should always speak with your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider before you start or change any weight management or physical activity plan. This tool is intended for informational purposes only and does not provide medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical advice from a qualified healthcare provider. Never stop or delay seeking treatment because of something you have read on triathloninspires.com. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or your local emergency number immediately.


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