Google translations (NOT 100% accurate).

Full-Iron Distance Training Programs

An Ironman© Triathlon is widely regarded to be one of the most challenging and physically demanding single-day sporting events in the world. It consists of a 2.4-mile swim, followed by a 112-mile bike ride and topped off with a regulation length marathon of 26.2-mile run.

Ironman® triathlons are long-distance triathlons with one major category:

Ironman® distance triathlon:
  • Swim: 3800m / 2.4mi
  • Bike: 180km / 112mi
  • Run: 42.2km / 26.2mi

  • There is no such thing as an Easy Ironman®. Covering 140.6 miles on any course, any day, in any variety of conditions, is a monumental challenge. Everyone who crosses the finish line knows how hard an Ironman triathlon is.

    Most Ironman® events have a strict time limit of 17 hours to complete the race. The race typically starts at 7:00 a.m.; the mandatory swim cut off for the 2.4-mile (3.9 km) swim is 9:20 a.m. (2 hours 20 minutes), the mandatory bike cut off time is 5:30 p.m. (8 hours 10 minutes), and the mandatory marathon cut off is midnight (6 hours 30 minutes). Any participant who manages to complete the triathlon within these timings becomes an Ironman.

    The story of the Ironman® began during an awards banquet for the Waikiki Swim Club, John Collins, a Naval Officer stationed in Hawaii, and his wife Judy, began playing with the idea of combining the three toughest endurance races on the island into one race. They decided to issue a challenge to see who the toughest athletes were: swimmers, bikers, or runners, and whoever finished the competition, will be called an Ironman®. On February 18, 1978, 15 competitors, including Collins, came to the shores of Waikiki to take on the first-ever Ironman® challenge.

    An Ironman® marathon is not the same as a stand-alone marathon. In this race, your performance will depend on how well you have dealt with the 3.8km swim and 180km bike, before you’ve even run a single step. Developing cardiovascular fitness is about getting your heart capable of beating at your race pace heart rate for the duration of your event, and then working effectively at that rate. Work smart to develop the fitness of your heart and lungs. For most athletes the easiest way to do this in a consistent, sustainable and injury-free manner is on the bike.

    Secondly, you should focus on increasing muscular endurance, building muscles that can produce the required power for the duration of the event. For an IM run, this involves getting the running muscles used to working effectively, when already fatigued.

    When it comes to nutrition, the bike ride is key to the success in an Ironman run. Aim to take on 60-90g of carbs per hour, tailored to an athlete’s individual needs based on experience gained in training and previous races.

    In training, a triathlete must learn the pace they should maintain for the run. Setting off too quickly will mean a drop-off in pace towards the end. A run-walk strategy can help: running for a set duration before walking for a distance can actually leave some athletes running much further. Consider walking though the aid stations and taking on valuable nutrition at the same time.

    The road to an Ironman® finish is a long one, and your biggest competitor and supporter is yourself. Instead of telling yourself you can’t swim faster or bike harder, speak positively to yourself. Positive self-talk has been proven to increase performance, so create an internal dialogue (either out loud or in your head) to interpret your feelings, give instruction to your body and receive feedback. This can be especially useful during the swim, when there are no true markers to tell you how far you’ve gone. Try a back-and-forth dialogue that will help you tap into how your body is really feeling. Then you can moderate and respond to these "voices" in a productive manner that will lead to greater success.


    Train for a succesful Full-Iron!

    1) Consistent Training
    There is no great secret to a successful ironman, it comes down to consistent training. If you are starting in a place where you have a strong base built across all three disciplines then you are in an ideal place to build 3 months out from your race day. It is these 3 months that are key and so it is crucial to aim to have consistent training during this time.

    2) Staying Injury Free
    Staying injury free goes hand in hand with consistent training. Now of course there are some of us out there who are more prone to injury and some who are less so however there are some key things that everyone can do to limit the risk of injury.

  • Regular massage whether this be with a deep tissue massage therapist or self massage using a foam roller or ideally a bit of both.
  • Don't let niggles develop into something more chronic (see a chartered physiotherapist if needed for professional advice).
  • Don't cram sessions together and don't play catch up (allow for recovery time).
  • Listen to your body (training for ironman will mean you do a lot of training sessions tired which in a way is good as it teaches you to keep form even when fatigued like what will happen on race day but know your limits especially when training for your first ironman when the distances/sessions are all new to the body and so its like constant overload.
  • Fuel the body (Make sure you have enough calories pre, during and post training and incorporate some protein into to your post training sessions).
  • I think it is key to do at least one strength and conditioning session a week to develop/maintain a strong core and reduce risk of overuse injury, focus on any weak/injury prone areas.

  • 3) Nailing your Key Sessions
    In the 3 months out from race day your training should become very focused and structured, follow an outline plan and have a key session in each discipline every week, these sessions will lengthen in distance through the months but you should be aiming to keep the intensity the same (your individual ironman pace). Then let the rest of your training be structured around these sessions. Prepare yourself for these sessions mentally and physically and nail them, do this consistently in the build phase and you will be in a good place to perform at your chosen race. The 3 month build should not be about doing long slow sessions but should be focused around your ironman intensity so that you are prepared to race at this intensity. Know what your iron man pace/HR is and train to this. If you plan to run 8minute miles, then don’t do you key IM sessions at 7.30© pace. That is not to say that you don’t train above IM intensity, it is necessary to train at half IM/Olympic pace to raise your threshold but for your key IM sessions stick to your goal pace, then it will be second nature on race day.

    4) Practice, Practice, Practice
    In a way an ironman race is easier to control and predict the outcome than shorter course racing like sprints/Olympics where small things can largely upset the outcome in a race but an ironman is a long race, of course there will be times where something comes in your way but it’s a long day so you can get back on track. As long as you've practiced over and over again the race pace intensity, nutrition, bike tribar position, bricks you will be able to trust in yourself and your body that the bad patch will pass or that a slow transition isn't the end of the world, just put it behind you and focus on what you’re doing. It’s all been practiced so just do what your body has learnt and> prepared to do, it should be ingrained!

    5) Nutrition
    Again an ironman is a long day so you won't get away without a well-practiced nutrition plan, you need to figure out how much calories your body needs to perform at whether your planning for a 9 or 12 hour ironman©. The general rule of thumb is 1 gm of carbs per kilo of body weight per hour. This is the easy part, the more complicated part is how you will get these calories in and working out what nutrition plan works for you and what your body will manage to digest during a race without causing GI distress. If it’s not your first ironman© this is easier as you have experience about what did or didn't work for you. If not then you have to practice it in training especially on your key sessions as it’s one thing digesting food/gels when biking easy but another thing when training at your ironman© pace. Keep notes as to what you ate/drank during your training and how you felt so that you can get a clear picture of what works for you. Also on race day be flexible, have your nutrition plan but don't ignore what your body is telling you, eg, if feeling bloated on the bike, ease of a little stick with water for a while and aim to get back on track with your nutrition plan as soon as you feel able. Don't ignore these stomach warnings and keep forcing fuel down as its likely to end coming back up but also don't forget that you have to fuel for what is ahead so if it means backing of the pace on the bike for a while this is better than getting 5k into the run and bonking. Also on the marathon be flexible, if you planned to take a gel every 30mins but your stomach is cramping every time you try perhaps switch to the carbohydrate drink. Research long before the race what nutrition they will be providing and try practicing with this first as it will be easier to take what they provide. Also nutrition is not only about what happens on race day, nutrition should be a vital cornerstone of all of your training, whether it be fuelling your winter training or the key sessions. Leave time in your training for a healthy diet and don't be fuelling with low quality foods on the go. Do this and you won't get everything you can out of your body in your training and you are at high risk of getting sick or injured which leads back to my first point of inconsistent training. If you are training for your first ironman© your calorie need will increase. Don't fight this.


    Full-Iron Distance Training - What to expect?

    Long-term Program

    Strength Training

    Weights/Gym

    Indoor Training Sessions*

    Outdoor Training Sessions*

    Intervals

    Triathlon Gear

    Nutrition Knowledge

    Prior Experience Requiered


    Recommended Gear for Long Distance Triathlons

    The Swim

  • Swim suit
  • Tri suit
  • Wetsuit
  • 2 sets of Goggles
  • Anti Fog Spray
  • Kickboard
  • Pull float
  • Swimming paddles
  • Body glide or lube
  • Advanced heart rate monitor
  • Bycicle speedometer (your advanced monitor can substuiture this)
  • Waterproof sunscreen
  • Chamois cream
  • Energy snacks
  • Swimming cap (if you have long hair)

    The Bike

  • Helmet
  • Cycling Lenses
  • Seat bag and tool kit: tube, CO2, levers, multi-tool
  • Heart Rate monitor chronograph
  • Bycicle speedometer (get a simple one)
  • Waterproof sunscreen
  • Energy snacks
  • Triathlon bicycle that fits you.
  • Cycling shorts
  • Cycling Jersey
  • Cycling clips
  • Cycling shoes and socks (if wearing)
  • Water bottles
  • Body glide or lube
  • Bento box
  • Nutrition (use ziploc bags to bring just the amount you need)

    The Run

  • Running shoes
  • Elastic no-tie shoelaces
  • Running socks
  • Hat/visor
  • Race belt
  • Vaseline, powder, band-aids

    Full-Iron Distance Training Plans

    Beginner Training Plans - Full-Iron Distance

    This program is designed to prepare you for your Ironman© race by building exceptional aerobic fitness. This plan is simple to follow and is written in every day language. Suggestions are made throughout to guide you in making training and race planning decisions. This is a beginner level Iron Distance training plan intended for use by the age group triathlete with at least one season of triathlon racing experience but with no Iron distance experience.

    What You Get:

    • A complete weekly training plan that culminates in the race of a Full-Iron (Ironman®) distance triathlon.
    • A personal training calendar powered by Training Peaks®.
    • Periodically workout reminders with tips and goals.
    • Track, Analyze and Plan your Training Workout Intensity, Heart Rate Training Zones, and other Results.
    • Access your online calendar training program from any device.

    For more information about this training program, please contact us at [email protected].



    Intermediate Training Plans - Full-Iron Distance

    This complete training plan for an Iron distance triathlon is designed for the intermediate triathlete who has some experience in medium and long distance triathlons, and has perhaps (not required) finished an Ironman© already, but wants to get faster!

    What You Get:

    • A complete weekly training plan that culminates in the race of a Full-Iron (Ironman®) distance triathlon.
    • A personal training calendar powered by Training Peaks®.
    • Periodically workout reminders with tips and goals.
    • Track, Analyze and Plan your Training Workout Intensity, Heart Rate Training Zones, and other Results.
    • Access your online calendar training program from any device.

    For more information about this training program, please contact us at [email protected].



    Advanced Training Plans - Full-Iron Distance

    This is for strong or advanced athletes looking to perform well in a full iron distance. If you are a strong athelte and have a history with long course training and racing. You have completed an Ironman© before, or have several Half Iron distance races under your belt. You are currently comfortable at or near 10-12 hours per week of training and have up to 19hrs in a week to devote to your training. To start this plan, you should be able to run for 2.5 hour, cycle for 4.5hrs, and swim 3500yds comfortably.

    What You Get:

    • A complete weekly training plan that culminates in the race of a Full-Iron (Ironman®) distance triathlon.
    • A personal training calendar powered by Training Peaks®.
    • Periodically workout reminders with tips and goals.
    • Track, Analyze and Plan your Training Workout Intensity, Heart Rate Training Zones, and other Results.
    • Access your online calendar training program from any device.

    For more information about this training program, please contact us at [email protected].



    Personalized Training Plans

    If you need a professional coaching training programs designed with your experience level, personal goals, and daily time constraints in mind, please contact us directlly. Regardless of what level you're competing at today, if you're committed to getting to the next level, we can help you get there. Personal Training Plans programs are developed to build your fitness to a peak for your target competitions at a level of training you can complete with good energy, injury free. Cost of the programs range from $75.00 to $200.00 per month, and may vary depending on what type of specific workouts and techniques you may need.

    For more information, please contact us at [email protected].



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