Google translations (NOT 100% accurate).

Olympic Distance Training Programs

After trying out a Sprint triathlon, moving up to an Olympic diatance is the logical next step.

Olympic triathlons are intermediate-distance triathlons with one major category:

Olympic distance triathlon:
  • Swim: 1500m / .93mi
  • Bike: 40km / 24.8mi
  • Run: 10km / 6.2mi

  • 1. Get in the water more

    The swim is often a subject which triathletes complain more. With the switch from Sprint to Olympic distance, triathletes must tackle a longer swim (more than double the distance). Joining a swim program such as Masters and making sure that you are in the pool at least two to three times per week, us very recommendable. Of course it will be optimal swimming on a 50-meter pool, and get in any open-water swim at least once a month will ease the transition.

    2. Grasp the interval

    Incorporating interval training into your schedule is another thing to do when preparing to move up to an Olympic-distance race. It can be as simple as 10-second bursts for beginners to hill repeats for intermediate level athletes to three-minute threshold intervals for more experienced racers. It will help you learn what a fast pace feels like.

    3. Don't hit "The Wall"

    The body will need additional calories for peak performance when doubling the distance. Don't forget about the nutrition aspect. You'll be out on the course for more than twice as long, so it's important you know how many and what type of calories to take in for the bike and what your fueling needs are on the run as well. Going on rides and runs longer than Olympic-distance length can help you address what your nutritional needs will be for the longer distance. To determine your specific needs, consider taking a sweat test to make sure you are getting in the optimum amount of calories.

    4. Prepare to balance more

    Before moving up, consider how the additional time training will affect other aspects of your life. Finding a balance between preparing for the race and other priorities will make the experience much more enjoyable. Consider the time and energy you have available for training, quantify that commitment, assess where it fits within your list of priorities, and then make an honest assessment if you are able to commit to making the jump up in distance. Going longer is often very rewarding as it presents new challenges and opportunities for growth, however, it will only be sustainable and fun with a healthy life balance.

    5. Your pace will be a priority

    Once you begin your Olympic distance training, you should incorporate workouts in all three disciplines at your predicted race pace. It is easy to get too wrapped up in race day and unwittingly attempt to race at sprint pace. Heart rate, pace and power can all be used as guides.

    6. You will spend more time

    While the race distance increase on the bike and run isn’t as dramatic as the swim, you still need to prepare the body for the workload of running after the bike. It’s not something you need to do every week, but four to six times before race day would be a good goal. Simulating race day conditions can make the workout more beneficial including setting up a mock up transition area to get the feeling of changing from one discipline to the other while tired.


    Olympic Distance Training - What to expect?

    Long-term Program

    Strength Training

    Weights/Gym

    Indoor Training Sessions*

    Outdoor Training Sessions*

    Intervals

    Triathlon Gear

    Nutrition Knowledge

    Prior Experience Requiered


    Recommended Gear for Olympic Distance

    The Swim

  • Swim suit
  • Wetsuit (this is not a "must have" item)
  • Tri suit
  • Goggles
  • Anti fog spray
  • Kickboard
  • Pull float
  • Swimming cap (if you have long hair)

    The Bike

  • Helmet
  • Cycling Lenses
  • Seat bag and tool kit: tube, CO2, levers, multi-tool
  • Heart Rate monitor chronograph
  • Bycicle speedometer (get a simple one)
  • Waterproof sunscreen
  • Energy snacks
  • Triathlon bicycle that fits you.
  • Cycling shorts
  • Cycling Jersey
  • Cycling clips
  • Cycling shoes and socks (if wearing)
  • Water bottles
  • Body glide or lube

    The Run

  • Running shoes
  • Elastic no-tie shoelaces
  • Running socks
  • Hat/visor

    Olympic Distance Training Plans

    Beginner Training Plans - Olympic Distance

    This program is intended for the beginner Olympic distance triathlete who has raced 2 or 3 spring distance events. This program includes interval training in the pool and on the track, completing workouts, and emphasis on tempo work.

    What You Get:

    • A complete weekly training plan that culminates in the race of an Olympic distance triathlon.
    • A personal training calendar powered by Training Peaks®.
    • Periodically workout reminders with tips and goals.
    • Track, Analyze and Plan your Training Workout Intensity, Heart Rate Training Zones, and other Results.
    • Access your online calendar training program from any device.

    For more information about this training program, please contact us at [email protected].



    Intermediate Training Plans - Olympic Distance

    This program is intended for the intermediate level triathlete who has raced at least 5 or 6 Olympic distance triathlons and who is aiming to finish in the top half of their age group. The emphasis on this program is on tempo and intensity and the user should be familiar with interval training and tempo work.

    What You Get:

    • A complete weekly training plan that culminates in the race of a Olympic distance triathlon.
    • A personal training calendar powered by Training Peaks®.
    • Periodically workout reminders with tips and goals.
    • Track, Analyze and Plan your Training Workout Intensity, Heart Rate Training Zones, and other Results.
    • Access your online calendar training program from any device.

    For more information about this training program, please contact us at [email protected].



    Advanced Training Plans - Olympic Distance

    This program should be used by an athlete who is experienced and: a) Have a very strong base of 4-6 months of consistent training. b) Have a strong swim or run background. c) Have trained for at least 6-8 hours per week. The schedule consists of 3-4 workouts per week in each sport, 1-2 days of strength training and core work too. The maximum volume is around 6-8 hours pretty consistently.

    What You Get:

    • A complete weekly training plan that culminates in the race of a Olympic distance triathlon.
    • A personal training calendar powered by Training Peaks®.
    • Periodically workout reminders with tips and goals.
    • Track, Analyze and Plan your Training Workout Intensity, Heart Rate Training Zones, and other Results.
    • Access your online calendar training program from any device.

    For more information about this training program, please contact us at [email protected].



    Personalized Training Plans

    We also offer ongoing training programs designed with your experience level, personal goals, and daily time constraints in mind. Regardless of what level you're competing at today, if you're committed to getting to the next level, we can help you get there. Personal Training Plans programs are developed to build your fitness to a peak for your target competitions at a level of training you can complete with good energy, injury free. Cost of the programs range from $75.00 to $200.00 per month, and may vary depending on what type of specific workouts and techniques you may need.

    For more information, please contact us at [email protected].


    Suggested Reading Material

    Triathlon Beginners Guide Download Here
    Basic Triathlon Gear List Download Here
    Bicycle Proper Seat Download Here
    Race day Checklist Download Here
    Setting Up Your Transition Spot Download Here
    USAT General Rules Download Here
    Post Race Download Here

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